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UPI Almanac for Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016

On Nov. 10, 1989, East German border guards tore away parts of the Berlin Wall as thousands of their countrymen swarmed through the symbol of a divided Europe, testing the government's open border decree and further crumbling the Iron Curtain.

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United Press International
A tourist walks by giant dominoes made by young Germans before a ceremony commemorating the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 8, 2009. During the ceremony, these dominoes will be toppled, symbolizing the fall of the original wall. Photo by David Silpa/UPI
A tourist walks by giant dominoes made by young Germans before a ceremony commemorating the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 8, 2009. During the ceremony, these dominoes will be toppled, symbolizing the fall of the original wall. Photo by David Silpa/UPI | License Photo

Today is Thursday, Nov. 10, the 315th day of 2016 with 51 to follow.

The moon is waxing. The morning star is Jupiter. The evening stars are Mercury, Saturn, Venus, Mars, Neptune and Uranus.

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Those born on this date are under the sign of Scorpio. They include Martin Luther, founder of Protestantism, in 1483; William Hogarth, English artist and engraver, in 1697; Irish author Oliver Goldsmith in 1730; actors Claude Rains in 1889, Richard Burton in 1925 and Roy Scheider in 1932; singer Jane Froman in 1907; bandleader Billy May in 1916; radio and television announcer George Fenneman in 1919; American Indian rights activist/actor Russell Means in 1939; lyricist Tim Rice in 1944 (age 72); country singer Donna Fargo in 1945 (age 71); rock musicians Greg Lake and Dave Loggins, both in 1947 (age 69); actor Mackenzie Phillips and sports journalist Linda Cohn, both in 1959 (age 57); filmmaker Roland Emmerich in 1955 (age 61); comedian Sinbad, born David Adkins, in 1956 (age 60); and actors Hugh Bonneville in 1963 (age 53), Tracy Morgan in 1968 (age 48), Brittany Murphy in 1977, and Kieran Shipka in 1999 (age 17).

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On this date in history:

RELATED UPI Archives: East Germans begin tearing down wall

In 1775, the United States Marine Corps, then known as the Continental Marines, was formed by order of the Second Continental Congress.

In 1865, the superintendent of the notorious Andersonville prison camp, Major Henry Wirz, is hanged for war crimes.

In 1871, journalist Henry Stanley found Scottish missionary David Livingstone in a small African village. His famous comment: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?"

RELATED UPI Archives: Berlin Wall falls

In 1898, a mob of more than 2,000 people, angry over the election of a Fusionist white mayor and a biracial city council, went on a rampage throughout the city of Wilmington, N.C., targeting and killing African Americans.

In 1918, a Western Union Cable Office in Nova Scotia received a top-secret message stating that all fighting related the Great War (World War I) would cease on Nov. 11, 1918.

In 1951, area codes were introduced in the United States, Canada and parts of the Caribbean, allowing direct-dialing of long-distance telephone calls.

In 1969, Sesame Street premiered on PBS.

In 1975, the ore freighter Edmund Fitzgerald broke in two and sank during a storm on Lake Superior, killing all 29 crew members.

In 1982, Soviet President Leonid Brezhnev died at age 75 after 18 years in power.

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In 1983, Microsoft released its Windows computer operating system.

In 1989, East German border guards tore away parts of the Berlin Wall as thousands of their countrymen swarmed through the symbol of a divided Europe, testing the government's open border decree and further crumbling the Iron Curtain.

In 1994, the only privately owned manuscript of Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci was sold at auction at Christie's in New York for $30.8 million, the highest amount paid for a manuscript.

In 2006, Mexico City lawmakers officially recognized same-sex civil unions.

In 2009, John Allen Muhammad, convicted as the sniper who killed 10 people in a 2002 shooting spree in the Washington area, was executed in Virginia.


A thought for the day: Author-poet Maya Angelou said, "Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make reading one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him."

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