facebook
twitter
search
search

Erickson Air-Crane supplying heicopters for Australian firefighting

Oct. 14, 2013 at 10:41 AM

PORTLAND, Ore., Oct. 14 (UPI) -- U.S. aviation services company Erickson Air-Crane Inc. is supplying six aircraft to support Australia's National aerial Firefighting Center.

The contract for the heli-tankers is for three years and carries a total value of about $60 million. It also features an option for the supply of additional helicopters as needed.

Udo Rieder, chief executive officer of Erickson, said the deal is in partnership with Kestral Aviation, a charter aircraft company based in Massachusetts.

"Erickson has been saving lives and resources fighting fires in Australia for 16 years," he said. "This new contract represents an important continuation of our relationship with the NAFC, one of the world's leading practitioners of aerial firefighting.

"We're proud to maintain a deep and established presence in Australia with this contract, and believe that the NAFC's ongoing commitment to Erickson reflects our excellent track record, high standard of service, and cost-effective solution. Our newest partner in the region, Kestrel Aviation – with whom we're teaming to provide the full range of diversified aerial support – is an established helicopter company with deep experience fighting fire in the rugged Australian environment."

The helicopters will be stationed initially in the states of Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia.

The S-64 Aircrane helicopters are equipped with the company's proprietary 2,650-gallon fire suppression system and a detachable water tank with multiple refill options.

Like Us on Facebook for more stories from UPI.com  
Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Top Stories
Ford recalls 432,000 North American vehicles over software bug
Aetna to acquire Humana for $37 billion in cash, stocks
New Zealand military receives medium heavy military trucks
BBC to lay off 1,000 people to make up for $234M in lost revenue
U.S. proposes tighter pipeline spill rules