Advertisement

Army tests MK-22 Precision Sniper Rifle at Fort Bragg ahead of fielding

Army tests MK-22 Precision Sniper Rifle at Fort Bragg ahead of fielding
A Sniper conducts post-drop live-fire test trials of the MK-22 Precision Sniper Rifle at Range 61 at Fort Bragg, N.C. Photo by James Finney/U.S. Army

Sept. 23 (UPI) -- The Army successfully tested the MK-22 Precision Sniper Rifle during exercises at Fort Bragg, N.C., to clear it for fielding, the branch announced.

"The modular nature of the PSR allows it to be tailored to meet mission requirements and is appealing to airborne snipers who are typically armed with long-barreled precision rifles of a single caliber offering," Sgt. 1st Class Marcus Love, of the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, said Wednesday in a press release.

Advertisement

To make sure the rifle was not degraded by shock after a jump, the test team applied a "mobile weapons boresight collimator" to it.

"This process established a baseline for sight reticle locations prior to and post airborne insertion," said ABNSOTD Test Technology Branch Chief Miles Crawford in the statement.

RELATED U.S. F-16 fighter jets intercept Cessna during U.N. General Assembly

"Testers can monitor any shift in the weapon sight reticle that may have been induced by shock with static line parachutes," Crawford said.

Sgt. Michael Liptak, a sniper with Headquarters an Headquarters Company, 2nd Batalion, 325th Infantry Regiment, expressed that he was impressed by the testing in the statement.

"I was surprised at the accuracy and the straightforward approach to testing the PSR," Liptak said.

Advertisement
RELATED U.S. Space Force to take over SATCOM operations from Army, Navy

According to the Army, the MK22 is part of the Army's PSR program, allowing the Army an extreme range weapons system that is lighter than current sniper rifles and including features that mask the sniper.

The Army announced in the spring it had awarded a nearly $50 million, five-year contract to Barrett Firearms to acquire 2,800 Multi-role Adaptive Design rifles.

"The increased engagement range will keep Snipers safer and increase the options for the local commander employing these combat multipliers," added Sgt. Austin Stevens, a sniper assigned to the 1st Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, in the statement.

RELATED U.S. Army finishes exercises in Turkey as part of Europe-focused drill

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement