Supreme Court hears Affirmative Action case

Published: 1978
Play Audio Archive Story - UPI

Tom Fody: The Supreme Court waited almost until the very end of its term to deal with the hottest potato on its 1978 calendar, the Allan Bakke so-called reverse-discrimination case. At issue was the right of a State university medical school to set aside a certain number of places, in this case 16 out of 100 in its freshmen class, for members of minority groups considered to be the victims of earlier discrimination. Allan Bakke, a white engineer, contended that admission system kept him out of the University of California Medical School, while less-qualified members of minority groups were accepted. A State court agreed, and so did five Justices of the Supreme Court, up to a point. That point was an order for the admission of Bakke to the Davis Medical School and the invalidation of the School’s special admissions program.

But at the same time, a different combination of five Justices also held that schools can use race as one factor in admissions programs, thus upholding the legality of many other so-called affirmative-action employment and school admissions plans.

This is Tom Fody.

Most Popular
Florida man pleads guilty after threatening to shoot Muslims at mosque
Typhoon Lan barrels toward Japan, delays election count
Bodies of missing hikers found embracing in Joshua tree
Stephen Curry throws mouthpiece at referee, ejected from Golden State Warriors loss
Florida police on the lookout for possible serial killer