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THE BACKSTREET BOYS IN CONCERT
Nick Carter with the Backstreet Boys performs in concert on the opening night of their 2005 world tour, at the Sound Advice Amphitheatre , in West Palm Beach, Florida, on July 22, 2005. (UPI Photo/Michael Bush)
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Conrad Powell "Nick" Carter (May 19, 1879 in Oatlands, Virginia - November 23, 1961 in Grasonville, Maryland), was a professional baseball player who played in the major leagues as a pitcher in 1908. In his only season in the Majors he played for the Philadelphia Athletics. Although he had never played in the Major Leagues prior to 1908, he was the Athletics' Opening Day starting pitcher in 1908 on April 14, 1908 against the New York Yankees at Hilltop Park. The Athletics lost that game. For the 1908 season, and his career, he pitched in 14 games, with 5 starts and 2 complete games. He had a won–loss record of 2–5 and an earned run average of 2.97. He had 17 walks and 17 strikeouts.

Carter attended the University of Virginia. Carter was drafted by Athletics' owner and manager Connie Mack in 1907 after playing minor league baseball for the Syracuse Stars of the New York State League from 1903 to 1907. He was considered the best pitcher in the league that season by New York State League team managers.

Carter split the 1908 season between the Philadelphia Athletics and the Kansas City Blues of the minor league American Association. Carter pitched in 26 games for the Blues in 1908, pitching 208 innings and posting a 10–13 won-lost record. In 1909 he spent the entire season with the Blues, pitching in 32 games and 229 innings, posting a 15–12 record. By 1911 he was back in the New York State League, pitching for the Elmira Colonels. He had a 10–13 won-lost record in 34 games for the Colonels in 1911. In 1913, he pitched for the Newport News Shipbuilders of the Virginia League. There he posted a 12–10 won-lost record in 28 games and 216 innings.

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.
It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Nick Carter."
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