Advertisement

Ex-Indians All-Star pitcher Doug Jones dies at 64

Ex-Indians All-Star pitcher Doug Jones dies at 64
Former Cleveland Indians pitcher Doug Jones died from complications of COVID-19 on Monday at the age of 64. Photo courtesy of the Cleveland Guardians

Nov. 23 (UPI) -- Doug Jones, a five-time All-Star relief pitcher who spent the majority of his MLB career in Cleveland, died at age 64, the Cleveland Guardians announced.

The Guardians confirmed the news of Jones' death Monday. Greg Swindell, Jones' former Indians and Houston Astros teammate, posted the initial news of his death on Twitter.

Advertisement

Swindell and Jones' family said Monday on social media that he died from complications of COVID-19. MLB.com and Cleveland.com reported the same cause of death.

"Sad to tweet, that a longtime friend, teammate, husband, father, grandfather and one hell of a pitcher Doug Jones has passed," Swindell tweeted. "RIP Jonsey. Please keep the family in your prayers."

RELATED Orioles' Trey Mancini, Giants' Buster Posey win Comeback Player of the Year honors

Jones was a third-round pick by the Milwaukee Brewers in the 1978 MLB Draft. He made his MLB debut in 1982. Jones joined the Cleveland Indians in 1985 as a free agent. He earned his first All-Star nod in 1988, when he posted a 2.27 ERA and 37 saves in 51 appearances.

He went on to additional All-Star appearances in 1989, 1990, 1992 and 1994. Jones joined the Houston Astros in 1992 as a free agent.

Advertisement

The Astros traded Jones to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1993. He signed with the Orioles in 1995 as a free agent and signed with the Chicago Cubs that same year.

RELATED Anthony DeSclafani returns to San Francisco Giants on 3-year, $36M contract

Jones re-signed with the Brewers in 1996. The Brewers traded Jones back to the Indians in 1998.He spent his final two seasons with the Oakland Athletics.

He retired in 2000.

Jones posted a 3.30 ERA and 303 saves in 846 career appearances over his 16-year tenure. He posted an overall record of 69-79. Jones led MLB with 70 and 73 games finished in the respective 1992 and 1997 seasons.

His 303 saves rank 29th in MLB history. His 640 career games finished rank 12th all-time.

Notable deaths of 2021

Lee Elder is introduced before the ceremonial tee shot to start the Masters Tournament at the Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga., on April 8, 2021. Elder, the first Black man to play in the Masters Tournament, died on November 29 at the age of 87. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement