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Canadian man invents Nintendo cartridge harmonicas

By Daniel Uria
A Canadian man created a novelty harmonica inspired by the idea of blowing into classic Nintendo Entertainment System cartridges. The Blotendo Harmonicartridges feature a fully functioning harmonica modeled on the classic video game cartridges. 
 Photo courtesy of <a class="tpstyle" href="https://ksr-ugc.imgix.net/assets/014/115/002/3b98fe4938134c988d357557be0fe9c9_original.gif?w=700&fit=max&v=1476483226&auto=format&frame=1&q=92&s=020e7aaa23594f24797eae94f2b87ab1">Blotendo</a>
A Canadian man created a novelty harmonica inspired by the idea of blowing into classic Nintendo Entertainment System cartridges. The Blotendo Harmonicartridges feature a fully functioning harmonica modeled on the classic video game cartridges. Photo courtesy of Blotendo

EDMONTON, Alberta, Oct. 20 (UPI) -- A Canadian man has created a harmonica inspired by classic Nintendo cartridges.

Brady Grumpelt has launched a Kickstarter campaign seeking funding for the 3D-printed instruments known as Blotendo Harmonicartridges.

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"The Blotendo Harmonicartridge will let you surprise your friends with a fun and musical blast from the past," Grumpelt said. "This classic game cartridge look with allow you to store this harmonica with your classic games, fit it nicely in your pocket, is durable, customizable and has a crisp sound, playing in the key of C."

Grumpelt told the CBC the idea came to him as he watched a friend attempt to boot up an original Nintendo Entertainment System cartridge by blowing into the open slot at the bottom.

"I had a weird idea one day," he said. "My tired brain thought — I saw someone blowing on an old school Nintendo game and I thought for a second that it was a harmonica. And I quickly corrected myself, but I thought, 'Well, geez. Did somebody ever do that?'"

When a quick Internet search yielded no such results, Grumpelt and his friend Ryan Senger contacted Lucas Sloan to see if his 3D printing company would be able to turn the idea into a reality.

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"I said, 'Can you put these two things together and make this a thing?' And he was able to do it, and it turned out pretty good on the first attempt," he said.

Grumpelt said they have since tested several versions of the Harmonicartridges and are seeking $3,046 to begin buying the necessary materials in bulk.

"You get a good sound out of it," he said of the current model. "We do have to do a little bit of machining as far as the cases themselves, but it's not too bad. We've timed it out and we could still turn out a few hundred a day if we needed to."

The group plans to offer a variety of parody labels, as well as custom labels featuring 8-bit sprites with customizable clothing, hair styles, accessories and backgrounds.

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