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Gallup: More in U.S. willing to take COVID-19 vaccine than 2 months ago

Masked pedestrians walk through Times Square in New York City. Gallup's survey Tuesday said Americans over the past two months apparently became more open to receiving an approved coronavirus vaccine. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI
Masked pedestrians walk through Times Square in New York City. Gallup's survey Tuesday said Americans over the past two months apparently became more open to receiving an approved coronavirus vaccine. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Nov. 17 (UPI) -- More Americans now say they're willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine after barely half said two months ago that they would be, according to a Gallup survey Tuesday.

Asked if they would take a coronavirus vaccine that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration, 58% said they would, the poll found. The other 42% said they would not.

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When Gallup asked the same question in September, just 50% said they would take a COVID-19 vaccine that was approved by the FDA.

Gallup found in the new survey that Democrats (69%) and Americans over the age of 65 (63%) were most likely to say they would take a vaccine. It showed that share among both Republicans and independents was 49%.

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The survey was taken between Oct. 19 and Nov. 1, before both Pfizer and Moderna reported that final-stage clinical data showed their respective vaccines are better than 90% effective.

"A vaccine for the disease is seen as key to returning Americans' lives to normal," Gallup wrote.

"The 42% of U.S. adults saying they would not get a vaccine is down from 50% in September, but still indicative of significant challenges ahead for public health and government officials."

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The most recent poll also showed that men (61%) are more willing to take the vaccine than women (54%), while those aged 18-44 (62%) are more willing than those 45-64 (49%).

Non-Whites appear to be most skeptical about a vaccine. Sixty-one percent of Whites said they would be inoculated, but just 48% of non-Whites said the same.

Gallup polled almost 3,000 U.S. adults for the survey, which has a margin of error of 3 points.

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