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New U.S. COVID-19 cases fall to 47,500; lowest one-day total in a month

St. Louis Public School Superintendent Dr. Calvin Adams loads food and school supplies into a vehicle on Saturday during a supply give-a-way to aid residents amid the coronavirus pandemic in St. Louis, Mo. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/d966d2fcd20ef6ac2f2ddb88745d7871/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
St. Louis Public School Superintendent Dr. Calvin Adams loads food and school supplies into a vehicle on Saturday during a supply give-a-way to aid residents amid the coronavirus pandemic in St. Louis, Mo. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI | License Photo

Aug. 3 (UPI) -- The United States saw a dramatic decline in new COVID-19 cases on Sunday -- 47,500, the lowest single-day figure in about a month.

The new cases raised the total U.S. caseload to 4.668 million since the start of the pandemic, according to updated data Monday by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. There have been 154,800 deaths.

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The Sunday figure is the lowest since the 45,000 new cases were reported July 6. In between, the United States averaged about 60,000 new cases each day. More than 1.9 million new cases were reported in July alone.

Deaths were also down Sunday, according to the COVID Tracking Project, which listed about 500 -- down from an average of 1,100 the week prior.

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USA Today reported that five states set records for COVID-19 deaths for the week ending Sunday -- Arkansas, California, Georgia, Idaho and Montana, and also commonwealth Puerto Rico. There were no new state records for new cases.

In Georgia, the state's largest school district said 260 employees have tested positive or are in quarantine.

The number of ill employees was compiled last week as Gwinnett County Public Schools began planning to begin classes at nearly 150 schools.

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Gwinnett County reported nearly 17,800 cases and 2.000 hospitalizations Sunday and is one of the most severely affected areas in Georgia.

"Through tracing, we know that the majority of these cases are the result of community spread, meaning we have people who have called in to report who have not been at school or work," district spokeswoman Sloan Roach said.

In Nevada, the state Legislature approved a measure Sunday guaranteeing that registered voters will receive a mail-in ballot for November's general election -- a measure opposed by President Donald Trump, who last week voiced support for delaying the election. Only Congress can delay an election and virtually no lawmakers have supported Trump's idea.

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Gov. Steve Sisolak is expected to sign the measure into law.

"We should be doing everything we can to allow people to vote and vote safely," state Sen. Nicole Cannizzaro said. "This bill is absolutely not an opportunity to create fraud in our elections, our to allow for ballot harvesting."

Trump again complained about the issue on Monday.

"Nevada's clubhouse governor made it impossible for Republicans to win the state," he tweeted. "Post Office could never handle the traffic of mail-in votes without preparation. ... See you in Court!"

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