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Chicago PD moves to fire 5 cops in Laquan McDonald shooting

By Doug G. Ware
Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke arrives for a court hearing at Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on December 18, 2015, in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. On Tuesday, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson filed paperwork to terminate Van Dyke and four other officers involved. File Photo by Zbigniew Bzdak/UPI/Pool | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/be25364d09af1e5261ff3c1ab1db193b/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke arrives for a court hearing at Leighton Criminal Court Building in Chicago on December 18, 2015, in the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. On Tuesday, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson filed paperwork to terminate Van Dyke and four other officers involved. File Photo by Zbigniew Bzdak/UPI/Pool | License Photo

CHICAGO, Aug. 30 (UPI) -- The superintendent of Chicago's police force moved Tuesday to terminate five officers involved in the controversial 2014 shooting death of Laquan McDonald.

Chicago Police Department Superintendent Eddie Johnson filed paperwork with the city's police board to fire officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot the 17-year-old more than a dozen times, Janet Mondragon, Daphne Sebastian, Ricardo Viramontes and Sgt. Stephen Franko.

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Van Dyke faces dismissal for shooting the teenager while the other four face termination for submitting police reports that are not consistent with the evidence, which critics say is suggestive of a cover-up attempt.

RELATED Aug. 18: Chicago police chief wants 7 officers fired in Laquan McDonald case

Van Dyke is also facing criminal prosecution in the case. He pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder charges in December.

Johnson's action Tuesday follows a recommendation from Chicago Inspector General Joseph Ferguson to terminate 10 police officers -- the five being considered along with some others who have retired or resigned.

The officers involved in the shooting argued that Laquan presented a threat to their safety because he carried a knife and was not compliant with their commands. Laquan's toxicology report later showed the teen had PCP in his system -- a drug that often elicits erratic and aggressive behavior in users.

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Critics, though, argue that it was not necessary for Van Dyke to shoot Laquan 16 times, some of which were inflicted as he lay on the ground nearly motionless.

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