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U.S.-Afghan security agreement falling apart as President Karzai issues new demands

Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai has issued new demands before he agrees to sign the U.S.-Afghanistan security agreement, prompting the White House to warn it may be forced to withdraw U.S. forces.

By
JC Finley
Afghan President Hamid Karzai points to a reporter during a press conference with US President Barack Obama in January 2013, in Washington, DC. The leaders were discussing a long-term US troop presence as American military forces considered a 2014 withdrawal date from Afghanistan. (UPI/Mike Theiler)
Afghan President Hamid Karzai points to a reporter during a press conference with US President Barack Obama in January 2013, in Washington, DC. The leaders were discussing a long-term US troop presence as American military forces considered a 2014 withdrawal date from Afghanistan. (UPI/Mike Theiler) | License Photo

Nov. 26 (UPI) -- The U.S.-Afghanistan security agreement reached last week and supported by Afghan tribal elders may fall apart as Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai issued new demands Monday in a meeting with National Security Adviser Susan Rice.

Karzai's new demands include U.S. assistance in peace talks with the Taliban, the release of all 17 Afghan citizens detained at Guantanamo Bay, and the end of "home entries" by U.S. troops conducting counter-insurgent operations in Afghanistan.

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The security agreement must be signed before the end of the year to enable U.S. and NATO to plan for a post-2014 military presence.

In response to Karzai's red-lines, Rice warned that "without a prompt signature, the U.S. would have no choice but to initiate planning for a post-2014 future in which there would be no U.S. or NATO troop presence in Afghanistan."

[New York Times] [White House]

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