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Blagojevich teaches history in prison

By Kristen Butler, UPI.com
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrives at his home after being sentenced to 14 years in federal prison on December 7, 2011 in Chicago. Blagojevich had been previously convicted of 18 criminal counts involving the attempted sale of a U.S. Senate seat, illegal shakedowns for campaign funds and lying to federal agents. (File/UPI/Brian Kersey)
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich arrives at his home after being sentenced to 14 years in federal prison on December 7, 2011 in Chicago. Blagojevich had been previously convicted of 18 criminal counts involving the attempted sale of a U.S. Senate seat, illegal shakedowns for campaign funds and lying to federal agents. (File/UPI/Brian Kersey) | License Photo

One year ago today, former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich went to federal prison to serve a 14-year sentence for attempting to sell the U.S. senate seat left vacant by Barack Obama after he was elected president.

The Chicago Tribune reports that Blagojevich, 56, remains "optimistic and positive," according to two of his attorneys. He continues to have faith that he will be vindicated through the appeal of his conviction and sentence. "He believes justice in the end will prevail," said Lauren Kaeseberg, one of his attorneys.

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In this June 20, 2005 file photograph former Illinois Senator Barack Obama (R) talks with former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich during a town hall meeting in St. Louis. Blagojevich was found guilty on 17 of 20 federal corruption counts, including attempting to sell Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat on June 27, 2011 in Chicago. (UPI/Bill Greenblatt/File)
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"He is passing the time by teaching history to other inmates," Kaeseberg said. "He is a very likable person. He's adaptable. He is really doing as well (as he can)."

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Blagojevich, like other inmates, gets five hours per month to call his family on the phone. His wife and daughters make the approximately thousand-mile journey to see him once every couple of months.

"That visiting room has to be one of the saddest places on Earth though," Blagojevich's wife, Patti, reportedly wrote in a Facebook post last May. "All those little kids visiting their dads. It breaks your heart."

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