Advertisement

Cuba works to restore power after grid collapses in wake of Hurricane Ian

A utility pole leans over a street after the passage of Hurricane Ian, in Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on Tuesday. Ian made landfall in western Cuba as a category 3 hurricane, causing considerable material damage with heavy rains and strong winds, before continuing northward toward Florida. Photo by Yander Zamora/EPA-EFE
A utility pole leans over a street after the passage of Hurricane Ian, in Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on Tuesday. Ian made landfall in western Cuba as a category 3 hurricane, causing considerable material damage with heavy rains and strong winds, before continuing northward toward Florida. Photo by Yander Zamora/EPA-EFE

Sept. 27 (UPI) -- Cuba began the slow process of getting its aging electrical grid back online Wednesday morning after Hurricane Ian dealt it a devastating blow the day before that left the entire island nation in the dark overnight.

Union Electrica, Cuba's national electric company said crews were working in the western section of the grid, where the storm did the most damage. Power slowly began to return in the eastern section Wednesday morning.

Advertisement

Officials hope that they will be able to generate enough power in the eastern and central sections of the grid to help get the western section online. It was not clear Wednesday morning how many homes have had their power restored.

The powerful storm hit western Cuba as a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds and torrential rains that caused heavy flooding. The power failure in the west cascaded to the other two island grid sections.

RELATED Hurricane Ian postpones Wednesday's Jan. 6 House committee hearing

"The fault has to do with the links between western, central and eastern Cuba," Union Electrica said, according to the Havana Times on Tuesday. "it is a complex process that demands precision work and the electrical system will be gradually restored between tonight and early tomorrow morning,"

Advertisement

Even before Ian, millions in Cuba suffered from daily blackouts and residents had become accustomed to the power being out for hours at a time.

"Its solution requires a lot of precision," the Ministry of Mines and Energy said, confirming online that the work had begun to return power to the island.

RELATED Hurricane causes shuffling of college, professional sports schedules

The storm made landfall at about 4:30 a.m. just southwest of the town of La Coloma in the Pinar Del Rio Province, and left a path of destruction in its wake as it moved Tuesday night toward Florida.

Forecasters had warned that Ian could generate a life-threatening storm surge, hurricane-force winds, flash floods and mudslides across western Cuba.

RELATED FEMA to Florida residents: Don't underestimate Hurricane Ian's strength

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement