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Jamal Khashoggi Way street sign unveiled in front of Saudi Embassy in D.C.

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A view of the new street sign unveiled named after the late Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi, "Khashoggi Way, outside of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. The U.S. Director of National Intelligence concluded Khashoggi's Istanbul murder was directly approved by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Photo by Ken Cedeno/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/8409c0c3b33a62ef1afb0fab7322cb41/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
A view of the new street sign unveiled named after the late Washington Post journalist Jamal Khashoggi, "Khashoggi Way, outside of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. The U.S. Director of National Intelligence concluded Khashoggi's Istanbul murder was directly approved by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Photo by Ken Cedeno/UPI | License Photo

June 15 (UPI) -- A sign designating a stretch of Washington, D.C.'s, New Hampshire Avenue in front of the Saudi Embassy as "Jamal Khashoggi Way" was unveiled Wednesday. Khashoggi was a Saudi dissident and columnist for the Washington Post who was murdered in 2018.

The U.S. Director of National Intelligence concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman approved Khashoggi's murder. Khashoggi was a Saudi national and an outspoken critic of the Saudi regime.

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The Council on American-Islamic Relations joined Democracy for the Arab World Now, the organization founded by Jamal Khashoggi, for the unveiling ceremony of the new street sign Wednesday.

"We hope that this sign will provide a permanent remembrance to all who pass by the embassy that this crime will not be forgotten and that Khashoggi's legacy will live on," CAIR said in a statement.

The D.C. Council decided unanimously back in December to rename the stretch of road for the murdered Washington Post columnist.

He was last seen alive in October 2018 as he went to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. Turkish officials obtained an audio recording of Khashoggi's murder and dismemberment.

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According to the Washington Post, Khashoggi moved to a Northern Virginia suburb in 2017 after repeated attempts by the Saudi royal government to silence him.

He went to the Turkish Consulate in Istanbul for a document needed to remarry, with plans to live in Istanbul.

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