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Total solar eclipse observed over Western Antarctica

Dec. 4 (UPI) -- A total solar eclipse darkened the skies over Western Antarctica Saturday, interrupting the continent's months-long period of constant daylight.

NASA shared video on YouTube showing the eclipse as observed by members of the JM Pasachoff Antarctic Expedition.

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The eclipse, caused by the moon moving between the Earth and the sun and casting a shadow on the Southern Hemisphere, began its period of totality over Antarctica at 2:44 a.m. Eastern Time, NASA said.

The space agency said the total eclipse was only observable from Antarctica, but partial eclipses were expected to be observable over South Africa, Chile, New Zealand and Australia.

Saturday's eclipse caused a brief interruption to the continual daylight experienced by Antarctica from mid-October until early April.

The next total solar eclipse to be visible over North America is expected April 8, 2024.

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