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Typhoon In-fa makes landfall in China on heels of record flooding

China braced for heavy rainfall as Typhoon In-fa made landfall Sunday afternoon, while portions of the country remain reeling from record flooding. Photo by Alex Plavevski/EPA-EFE
China braced for heavy rainfall as Typhoon In-fa made landfall Sunday afternoon, while portions of the country remain reeling from record flooding. Photo by Alex Plavevski/EPA-EFE

July 25 (UPI) -- Typhoon In-fa made landfall in China on Sunday bringing heavy rains to a region still reeling from record flooding.

The storm made landfall in the city of Zhoushan in the Zhejiang province on China's eastern coast at 12:30 p.m. local time.

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In-fa's center is moving through Zhoushan and Ningbo with rainfall of 1 to 2 feet expected in some places and a maximum of 4 feet in the provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangsu, potentially producing life-threatening flooding, mudslides and other issues, according to Accuweather.

China's Meteorological Administration said the storm was moving at speeds of 85 mph and was forecast to travel north along the coast of Zhejiang passing Shanghai in the afternoon and Jiangsu in the evening.

RELATED China thanks Taiwan for concern over devastating floods

Zhejiang's emergency management department upgraded its typhoon response to the highest level on Saturday, shutting down schools and markets and suspending road traffic in some cases.

All inbound and outbound flights to Shanghai, which is home to about 26 million people, and the city of Hangzhou in the south were canceled.

Train services were also largely shuttered as Shanghai said it would slow subway trains and Hangzhou authorities said underground trains would be suspended.

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In-fa's arrival comes after record flooding in central China that killed at least 58 people, caused power outages and forced more than 1 million people to relocate.

Elsewhere, Tropical Storm Nepartak formed in the Philippine Sea and was moving north with winds of 45 mph, threatening to hit Japan as it hosts the Summer Olympic Games already hampered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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