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China slams U.N. Security Council 'leak' on Myanmar

China's foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said a closed-door U.N. Security Council meeting failed to guard against the leak of internal documents after the Council met Tuesday. File Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
China's foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said a closed-door U.N. Security Council meeting failed to guard against the "leak" of internal documents after the Council met Tuesday. File Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI | License Photo

Feb. 3 (UPI) -- China said it is "shocked" that documents about Myanmar-related discussions at the United Nations Security Council were "leaked" after a closed-door gathering on Tuesday.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said Wednesday at a regular press briefing that details about the Security Council meeting should not have been made public.

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On Tuesday the U.N. Special Envoy on Myanmar Christine Schraner Burgener said she condemned the recent power grab by Myanmar's military and the detention of top politicians, including State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi.

Wang said the "international community should create a sound external environment for Myanmar to properly resolve the differences," suggesting a different approach to the military takeover in Myanmar, which the United States has labeled a coup, according to Voice of America.

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"China is also baffled and shocked by the leak of internal documents under discussion at the Security Council," Wang said.

"This is not how the Security Council runs its day-to-day work, nor will it be conducive to the solidarity of and mutual trust between Security Council members."

The Chinese spokesman, who stressed the importance of "political and social stability," also said "all parties in Myanmar will properly handle their differences."

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China's call to not interfere with Myanmar comes after the U.S. assessment of a coup, a decision that will influence U.S. aid to Myanmar. A State Department official has said potential sanctions would not impact humanitarian assistance to the country, according to VOA.

China's subdued response to the military coup in Myanmar could be taking into Chinese economic interests in the Southeast Asian nation.

China and Myanmar cooperate on oil transport via the construction of pipelines, which helps China reduce its dependence on sea routes through the Malacca Strait.

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China is also Myanmar's biggest trading partner, and exchange with China occupies about one-third of Myanmar's trade volume, according to Chinese commerce statistics from 2019 to 2020.

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