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Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano erupts, ash rises over 1,600 feet

Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano erupts, ash rises over 1,600 feet
Anak Krakatau erupted twice Friday night. Photo courtesy of PVMBG

April 11 (UPI) -- Indonesia's Anak Krakatau volcano erupted overnight, spewing ash and smoke more than 1,600 feet high, scientists said Saturday.

The first eruption occurred at 9:58 p.m. Friday and lasted 1 minute and 12 seconds with ash and smoke spewing about 650 feet high, the Center for Volcanology and Geological Disaster Mitigation's magma volcanic activity report said.

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The second eruption at 10:35 p.m. lasted 38 minutes and 4 seconds, spewing out volcanic gray ash from the bottom crater 1,640 feet high, blowing north, Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation shows.

"PVMBG monitoring shows that the eruption continued until Saturday morning at 5:44 [ Western Indonesian Time]," Agus Wibowo, head of data, information and communication center for the National Disaster Mitigation Agency, said in a statement.

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"Based on our observation, no volcanic ashes or sulfurs smell have been reported until Saturday morning," the Regional Agency for Disaster Management in Lampung said. "So far, there have been no damage reports."

The situation was being monitored, but local residents have returned home.

Some residents in Indonesia's metropolitan area said they heard "a loud rumble," but PVMBG head Pat Kasbani said that might have been "unrelated to the eruption."

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Still, volcanology expert Surono, who uses only one name, said citizens in the metropolitan area may have been able to hear the eruption since there was less activity in Indonesia's capital, Jakarta. It was the first day of a partial lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus.

The eruption was small compared to other eruptions in the past couple years, Kasbani said, but Earth Sky reported that it was the longest eruption since 2018.

The volcano, also known as Krakatoa, is an island in a caldera between the islands of Java and Sumatra in the Indonesian province of Lampung. It emerged in 1883 from a caldera that destroyed the island of Krakatau formed.

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Since the word "Anak" means "child" in Indonesian, the volcano is also called Child of Krakatau.

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