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China calls on U.S. to remove extra tariffs; more talks planned

By Tauren Dyson and Allen Cone
China calls on U.S. to remove extra tariffs; more talks planned
Chinese Vice Premier Liu He called for the United States to remove all tariffs on goods coming from the Asian super power during a trade negotiation in Washington, D.C. File Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI | License Photo

May 11 (UPI) -- Chinese Vice Premier Liu He called for the United States to remove all tariffs on goods coming from the Asian super power during a trade negotiation in Washington, D.C.

This news came as leaders of the world's two largest economies ended negotiations Friday without a trade deal in place.

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The stalled negotiation came hours after President Donald Trump increased tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on Chinese goods worth $200 billion.

"China-U.S. relations are of great importance," Liu said, during a news conference. "Cooperation is the only right choice for the two sides, but it has to be based on principle."

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Trump showed confidence in his decision to levy tariffs by tweeting: "Tariffs will make our Country MUCH STRONGER, not weaker. Just sit back and watch!"

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On Saturday, Trump theorized why negotiations broke off, tweeting: "I think that China felt they were being beaten so badly in the recent negotiation that they may as well wait around for the next election, 2020, to see if they could get lucky & have a Democrat win -- in which case they would continue to rip-off the USA for $500 Billion a year."

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And he followed it up with a tweet on how he expects to be re-elected.

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U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said the Trump administration will announce a plan Monday to put tariffs on another $300 billion in Chinese imports. That would essentially put duties on all goods from China.

Trump believes tariffs would provide financial aid to the U.S. farming industry and other aspects of the economy harmed by the trade war between the two countries.

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Liu dismissed claims that trade talks had broken down, saying, "Negotiations have not broken down."

He added, "It's normal to have hiccups during the negotiations. It's inevitable."

Liu said both sides will be negotiating again in Beijing to continue negotiations and that he is "optimistic" about the future outcome.

In a statement, Chinese officials said the country "deeply regrets that it will have to take necessary countermeasures." To date, the China hasn't retaliated against the United States for the tariffs.

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