Advertisement

French police kill suspected Strasbourg shooting gunman

By Clyde Hughes and Daniel Uria
French police kill suspected Strasbourg shooting gunman
Members of the French National Police BRI search Wednesday for a suspect following a deadly shooting at a Christmas market in Strasbourg, France. Photo by Patrick Seeger/EPA-EFE

Dec. 13 (UPI) -- French police shot and killed the suspect in a deadly shooting at the city of Strasbourg's Christmas market after a manhunt Thursday, police said.

Local police officials said a suspect had been killed after opening fire on officers in the Neudorf area of the city, The Independent reported.

Advertisement

The suspect, Cherif Checkatt, was wanted in an international manhunt. Authorities said Chekatt was already on a terrorist watch list and police raided his home this week in a separate investigation.

A third death was confirmed in the shooting at France's largest Christmas market in Strasbourg Tuesday night. Police initially said three died, but clarified later the third person was "brain dead."

RELATED Macron announces 'economic state of emergency' to quell 'yellow vest' protests

The shooting harkened back to past Islamic State and al-Qaida assaults that have transpired in France and other European countries in recent years. The attack also came as France tried to contain the violent "yellow vest" economic protests that roiled Paris and other French cities for the past four weekends.

Police had said they would take Chekatt dead or alive and believed he could be in France or Germany. German police launched a raid near the French border in Kehl in the search.

Advertisement

With more than 27 criminal convictions, Chekatt, 29, is known for robberies and break-ins with possible links to jihadists in France, The Guardian reported. Strasbourg, near the German border, is believed to be the home of one of the largest concentration of suspected jihadist cells in France.

RELATED France and the failure of socialism

Strasbourg Mayor Roland Ries said last year its residents made up 10 percent of the country's intelligence services' watch list of potential security risks.

Latest Headlines

Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us

Advertisement