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Dora weakens to tropical storm off Mexico's coast

By Andrew V. Pestano and Doug G. Ware
The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday said Dora, which is about 295 miles southwest of the southern tip of the Mexican state of Baja California, has weakened to a tropical storm after a short stint as the 2017 storm season's first hurricane. Image courtesy of NOAA
The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday said Dora, which is about 295 miles southwest of the southern tip of the Mexican state of Baja California, has weakened to a tropical storm after a short stint as the 2017 storm season's first hurricane. Image courtesy of NOAA

June 28 (UPI) -- The National Hurricane Center downgraded Dora, the first hurricane of the 2017 season, to a tropical storm as the system continues to weaken off the Mexican coast.

The NHC on Wednesday said Dora, which is about 295 miles southwest of the southern tip of the Mexican state of Baja California, has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. The storm is moving west-northwest at a speed of 10 mph as it advances farther into the Pacific Ocean.

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Dora will weaken further and is expected to degenerate by late Wednesday to a remnant low, which will dissipate by Thursday night. The NHC said tropical-storm-force winds extend north of the storm's center up to 35 miles. No tropical storm watches or warnings are in effect.

"Swells affecting the southwestern coast of the Baja California peninsula will gradually subside today but could still cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions," the NHC said in a statement.

About 2 inches of rain dropped on Mexico's Guerrero and Michoacán states Monday due to Dora, which is the first hurricane of either the 2017 Pacific or Atlantic hurricane seasons. It followed six tropical storms -- Arlene, Bret and Cindy in the Atlantic and Adrian, Beatriz and Calvin in the Pacific.

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