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North Korea calls South Korea visit to U.S. a 'betrayal'

North Korea likened the Park-Obama summit to a "sloppy and stupid slapstick comedy" and said it would never give up its nuclear weapons.

By Elizabeth Shim
South Korean President Park Geun-hye and President Barack Obama said Friday that North Korea posed the "biggest threat" to the Korean peninsula. On Monday, Pyongyang fought back with words and accused South Korea and the United States of "threats and provocations." Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/070bb66c012e7927a24745be03e7715f/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
South Korean President Park Geun-hye and President Barack Obama said Friday that North Korea posed the "biggest threat" to the Korean peninsula. On Monday, Pyongyang fought back with words and accused South Korea and the United States of "threats and provocations." Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

SEOUL, Oct. 19 (UPI) -- North Korea said the U.S.-South Korea joint agreement on security and cooperation was a "piece of waste paper with a daylong lifespan" and that it would "never give up" its nuclear program.

Pyongyang's state-controlled media outlet Uriminzokkiri made the statement Monday following a joint statement from South Korean President Park Geun-hye and President Barack Obama on Friday. South Korean outlet News 1 reported the statement was the first response to the Park-Obama summit, and was issued under the headline, "The sound of bells worn by old donkeys headed for the grave."

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Without mentioning Park by name, Uriminzokkiri stated, "The South Korean authority's visit to the United States was a betrayal of the country to appease the United States and a panhandling gesture that draws conflict to a unitary people."

In a separate statement in Pyongyang's state-controlled newspaper Rodong Sinmun, North Korea likened the summit to a "sloppy and stupid slapstick comedy" being carried out by "a master and his hunting dog," South Korean news agency Yonhap reported. North Korea then claimed Park and Obama were re-enacting an abominable "show of masks" like two "dogs" when they "agreed enthusiastically" to "harm a unitary people."

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On Friday at the White House, Obama and Park said they recognize North Korea's nuclear provocations as the "biggest threat to the Korean peninsula," but Pyongyang fought back with words on Monday and accused anti-Pyongyang authorities in South Korea and the United States of "threats and provocations."

In its statement on Uriminzokkiri, North Korea said its nuclear program is justified because of a "hostile U.S. policy toward North Korea."

"As long as the hostile policy of the United States and its nuclear threats are not removed, we will never give up our nuclear program," the statement read.

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