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WikiLeaks raising $100,000 for Trans-Pacific Partnership bounty

By
Andrew V. Pestano
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has called details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement to be made public. File Photo by Hugo Philpott/UPI
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has called details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement to be made public. File Photo by Hugo Philpott/UPI | License Photo

WASHINGTON, June 3 (UPI) -- WikiLeaks is crowd-sourcing funds to pay for a $100,000 bounty for the remaining chapters of the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.

Three draft chapters of the 29-chapter trade agreement have been published by WikiLeaks in the last two years, which illustrate details on intellectual property rights and possible environmental rules.

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The TPP is a controversial trade deal being negotiated in secret between the United States and 11 nations of the Pacific, including Australia, Canada, Japan and Mexico.

"The transparency clock has run out on the TPP. No more secrecy. No more excuses. Let's open the TPP once and for all," WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said.

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President Barack Obama wants to pass the trade agreement through Congress but many Democrats oppose, stating it may result in job losses for the United States and that it does not offer enough protections against abuse by powerful multinational companies.

Supporters argue that the agreement will open up trade and help the United States and its allies compete economically with China.

"The remaining 26 chapters of the deal are closely held by negotiators and the big corporations that have been given privileged access," WikiLeaks said in a statement. "Today, WikiLeaks is taking steps to bring about the public's rightful access to the missing chapters of this monster trade pact."

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The bounty is part of a new "competition system" by WikiLeaks, currently called PUGG (Prize for Understanding Good Government), to offer financial rewards for documents, which allows the "public to pledge prizes towards each of the world's most wanted leaks."

About $35,000 of the $100,000 WikiLeaks is offering as bounty has been raised as of Wednesday morning.

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