Advertisement

Burkina Faso's military says it will turn over power following opposition meeting

"Power does not interest us, only the greater interest of the nation," Burkina Faso's military announced Sunday evening following mass protests against the military takeover.

By JC Finley
Following the resignation of Burkina Faso President Blaise Compaore on Oct. 31, 2014, citizens have protested the military takeover. (UPI/Mike Theiler)
Following the resignation of Burkina Faso President Blaise Compaore on Oct. 31, 2014, citizens have protested the military takeover. (UPI/Mike Theiler) | License Photo

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso, Nov. 3 (UPI) -- Protesters in Burkina Faso's capital clashed with security forces on Sunday in opposition to the military takeover following President Blaise Compaore's resignation on Friday.

Army Lt. Col. Isaac Zida was named leader of the transitional government on Saturday, a move that prompted massive rallies in Ouagadougou on Sunday.

Advertisement

At a rally outside the state broadcaster on Sunday, gunfire broke out shortly after the arrival of opposition leader Saran Sereme and former Defense Minister Kwame Lougue, who were both expected to announce their respective interest in heading the transitional government. One protester was reportedly killed.

By Sunday evening, the military issued a statement following a meeting between Zida and opposition leaders that the military would turn over power.

"Power does not interest us, only the greater interest of the nation," the military announced. According to a military spokesman, the army planned to establish "a transition body... with all the components to be adopted by a broad consensus."

The president resigned Friday amid violent unrest that broke out in response to a proposed constitutional amendment that would have extended the presidential term limit, allowing Compaore -- who held the post for 27 years -- to run for office again.

Advertisement

Zida explained that he took control Saturday "to prevent a state of anarchy that would be detrimental to the goal of democratic change."

Latest Headlines