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Rosh Hashanah celebrated globally, as Jews usher in the Hebrew New Year

Shana Tova!

By
Matt Bradwell
An Israeli boy blows a shofar, a ram's horn, in a shop in the Mahane Yehuda market in central Jerusalem, Israel, September 24, 2014. Jews will blow the shofar in synagogues during Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, services. UPI/Debbie Hill
An Israeli boy blows a shofar, a ram's horn, in a shop in the Mahane Yehuda market in central Jerusalem, Israel, September 24, 2014. Jews will blow the shofar in synagogues during Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, services. UPI/Debbie Hill | License Photo

JERUSALEM, Sept. 24 (UPI) -- World leaders, celebrities and major corporations have come together to wish the world "Shana Tova," or "a good year," in recognition of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year celebration.

Marking the end of the Hebrew calendar, Wednesday's Rosh Hashanah festivities and observances will bring the Hebrew year 5774 to a close and kick off 5775 at sunset on Friday with the sound of a Shofar, a hollowed ram's horn blown throughout the new year to remind believers to consider the year gone by.

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Celebrants will spend the week with friends, family and in synagogue, solemnly reflecting on the past year and seeking forgiveness from those they have wronged.

But Rosh Hashanah isn't only about introspection and anticipation -- it's also about honey! In the hopes of a sweet year, Jewish people around the world will enjoy honey cake and honey-dipped treats like apples and challah. They will then reflect for 10 days until Yom Kippur, when they will fast for 25 hours.

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