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Scotland says 'No Thanks,' will remain part of the United Kingdom

"Scotland says no! Scotland says no!" chanted relieved supporters of remaining in the United Kingdom.

By
Matt Bradwell
A young Yes campaigner watches the proceedings on the day Scottish residents decide the future political direction their country will take in Glasgow,Scotland on September 18, 2014.Ninety-seven percent of the population has registered to vote. EST. UPI/Hugo Philpott
A young Yes campaigner watches the proceedings on the day Scottish residents decide the future political direction their country will take in Glasgow,Scotland on September 18, 2014."Ninety-seven percent" of the population has registered to vote. EST. UPI/Hugo Philpott | License Photo

EDINBURGH, Scotland, Sept. 18 (UPI) -- After 307 years as a unified government, the United Kingdom will continue into its 308th and beyond as the people of Scotland have said, "No thanks" to leaving the family of nations in favor of independence.

"Scotland says no! Scotland says no," chanted supporters of the victory as the final tallies were announced.

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Despite a brief hope for separatists as Glasgow reported voting for Scottish independence, 55 percent of reporting districts chose unity by the time the night was through.

"Having spent two long years emphasizing our differences, we have now got to talk about what Scots, everyone here, has in common in bringing the country back together and make a success of what has been a remarkable turnout," Labour Party MP Jim Murphy told Sky News.

"We are going to have to make a success of the decision Scotland has made. While I'm delighted, there is no time or space for triumph and we have got to get on and offer that devolution package we offered and unite the country around that."

"We're disappointed to have lost in Glasgow but we have to bear on mind that this is a collective vote through the whole country," said Labour Glasgow City Councillor Alastair Watson according to the Daily Record.

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As the first group of Scotland's 32 voting districts reported, the Shetland area saw 64 percent of voters choose unity, while 67 percent of voters in the Orkney region also favored remaining in the United Kingdom. Support for independence was as poor in Dumfries and Galloway, where only 34 percent of Scots wanted to become an independent nation.

Only 38 percent of voters in East Lothian checked yes in the voting booth, providing yet another blowout for unity. Angus, Abereen and Stirling echoed these results as 56, 59 and 60 percent of their respective electorates also chose no.

The biggest early blow to Scottish independence came from Clackmannanshire, where 54 percent of voters chose no. Despite the tighter margin than Shetland and Orkney, Clackmannanshire residents were expected to favor divorcing England.

Scots favoring Independence came close to winning a majority in Inverclyde, where they nearly split the vote. But even in Inverclyde, the separatists fell 86 votes short of their opponents. Nearly 55,000 people voted in Inverclyde. North Ayrshire broke for the nos along similar margins.

Falkirk and Renfrewshire followed the trend of narrowly saying "No thanks," with 53 percent of voters in each district opting to stay in the U.K. Fifty-six percent of Midlothian residents also prefer unity.

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Dundee City provided the first region-wide victory for independence, as 57 percent of voters prefer Scotland govern itself. Minutes later West Dunbartonshire reported favoring independence 54 percent to 46 percent.

But as the votes continued to come in, an independent Scotland became less and less of a reality.

Over 60 percent of voters in Perth and Kinross, the Shetland Islands, East Dunbartonshire and East Renfrewshire said they prefer the current system of governance.

Meanwhile Glasgow City briefly resurrected hopes of independence. Fifty-three percent of Glasgow's nearly 370,000 voters prefer to wake up free from the shadow of the English crown. Announced just before 5:00 a.m. local time, the metropolitan vote was enough to shrink the no lead from 56 percent to 53 percent.

Shortly after, North Lanarkshire announced it also broke for the Scottish Nationalist Party 51 percent to 49.

"Yes" chants that ignited after Glasgow's votes were announced fell to silence as West Lodian, East Ayreshire and South Ayrshire all gave their majorities to no. Any remaining optimism was squelched when only 41 percent of Aberdeen residents chose independence.

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By the time Edinburgh reported, its 61 percent no vote was a mere formality.

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