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Yao Ming working to save elephants and rhinos

100,000 elephants have been poached to satiate the ivory market in the past three years.

By Thor Benson
Yao Ming working to save elephants and rhinos
A Chinese woman walks past a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service billboard featuring NBA staring Yao Ming, to promote public awareness of endangered species in downtown Beijing, China on June 05, 2007 The U.S. Department of the Interior has sponsored hundreds of these billboards throughout China in hopes of educating a culture know for its taste for endangered species of the negative global impact of killing these species. (UPI Photo/Stephen Shaver) | License Photo

NEW YORK, Sept. 6 (UPI) -- Since Yao Ming visited Africa in 2012, he's been worried about elephant and rhino poaching.

Ming has decided to become a fighter against the ivory trade, which is not a surprise after his railing against the shark fin industry.

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Ming can be seen in a new documentary that highlights the killing of elephants and rhinos for their ivory that will have its U.S. premiere in November. Ming has been working alongside the WildAid charity since 2006 to help them illuminate atrocities against animal life.

China allows licensed shops to sell ivory, whether it be for medicine or ornaments, but much of the trafficking of ivory is illegal. Mao hopes to convince Chinese citizens to stop supporting the industry.

Reports indicate that authorities seized over 23 tons of ivory in 2011 alone. A pound of rhino horn can sell for as high as $30,000 in China.

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