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Kremlin threatens to release Putin call with EU head

"If that was really done, it looks not worthy of a serious political figure," Putin's foreign policy adviser Yuri Ushakov said. "Irrespective of whether these words were pronounced or not, this quote was taken out of context and had a very different meaning."

By
Aileen Graef
From L to R: Austrian Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel, Russian President Vladimir Putin, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and European Union Foreign Policy Chief Javier Solana stroll during the EU summit in the Black Sea city of Sochi on May 25, 2006. Putin is meeting EU officials to discuss Western concerns about energy security and Russian democracy and he is set to sign agreements easing visa procedures for mutual travel. (UPI Photo/Anatoli Zhdanov)
From L to R: Austrian Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel, Russian President Vladimir Putin, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and European Union Foreign Policy Chief Javier Solana stroll during the EU summit in the Black Sea city of Sochi on May 25, 2006. Putin is meeting EU officials to discuss Western concerns about energy security and Russian democracy and he is set to sign agreements easing visa procedures for mutual travel. (UPI Photo/Anatoli Zhdanov) | License Photo

MOSCOW, Sept. 2 (UPI) -- The Kremlin is threatening to release the recording of a call between Russian President Vladimir Putin and EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso after accusing Barroso of taking Putin's words out of context.

Vladimir Chizhov, Russia's ambassador to the European Union, said the country will release the contents of the call unless Barroso objects within two days. This comes after Putin's foreign policy adviser Yuri Ushakov accused the EU president of breaching diplomatic confidentiality and taking his words out of context.

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The alleged statement was made during a conversation between Putin and Barroso regarding the conflict in Ukraine. They were specifically discussing the accusation that Russia sent military units in Ukraine to purposely escalate the crisis. Barroso then relayed the conversation to his colleagues at a summit of the European Union.

"If that was really done, it looks not worthy of a serious political figure," Ushakov said. "Irrespective of whether these words were pronounced or not, this quote was taken out of context and had a very different meaning."

"If I want to, I can take Kiev in two weeks," said Putin on the call, according to a story in Italy's La Repubblica newspaper. The implication is that Putin's threat to take Kiev would be in response to increased European sanctions.

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NATO is reporting at least 1,000 Russian troops have entered in Ukraine.

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