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Global deaths by terrorism up 30 percent in past 12 months

Iraq has seen the most terrorist-related deaths, the survey said.

By Ed Adamczyk
Pakistani Rangers stand alert at the entrance way of district courts buildings after suicide bombers attacked a court complex killing at least 11 people,in Islamabad on March 3, 2014. UPI/Sajjad Ali Qureshi
Pakistani Rangers stand alert at the entrance way of district courts buildings after suicide bombers attacked a court complex killing at least 11 people,in Islamabad on March 3, 2014. UPI/Sajjad Ali Qureshi | License Photo

BATH , England, July 24 (UPI) -- Terrorist-related deaths around the world have increased by 30 percent in the past 12 months, a British report says.

Data compiled by Maplecroft -- a Bath, England, risk analysis company -- noted the increase compared to an average of global terrorist deaths in the past five years.

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"Maplecroft's Terrorism and Security Dashboard (MTSD)," covering incidents in 197 countries, noted Iraq has had the most attacks in the past year, 3,158. Nigeria's are the most deadly, with an average of 24 deaths per attack, and the most significant increases in terrorism have occurred in China, Egypt, Kenya and Libya.

Analysts found 18,668 deaths by terrorism in the 12 months prior to July 1, 2014, a 29.3 percent increase in the five-year average of 14,443.

"The dynamic nature of terrorism means individual events are impossible to predict. However, up-to-date global intelligence on the intensity, frequency, precise location and type of attacks can help organizations to make informed decisions relating to market entry, security measures for in-country operations, duty of care obligations, supply chain continuity and risk pricing," said Maplecroft CEO Alyson Warhurst.

Analyst Jordan Perry added, "Libya, Kenya and Egypt are among a handful of countries to witness a significant increase in risk in the MTSD and investor confidence in key sectors, including tourism and oil and gas, has been hurt."

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