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Video shows Libyans rescuing Stevens

A small American flag is seen in the rubble at the United States consulate, one day after armed men stormed the compound and killed the U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three others in Benghazi, Libya on September 12, 2012. The gunman were protesting a little known film by an American amateur filmmaker that angered Muslims as it was deemed insulting to the Prophet Mohammad. UPI/Tariq AL-hun
A small American flag is seen in the rubble at the United States consulate, one day after armed men stormed the compound and killed the U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three others in Benghazi, Libya on September 12, 2012. The gunman were protesting a little known film by an American amateur filmmaker that angered Muslims as it was deemed insulting to the Prophet Mohammad. UPI/Tariq AL-hun | License Photo

BENGAZI, Libya, Sept. 17 (UPI) -- An amateur Internet video appears to show a crowd carrying U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens out from the U.S. Consulate in Libya where he was killed.

The video, posted online Sunday, shows the people apparently trying to help the motionless Stevens after the U.S. Consulate in Bengazi, Libya, had been attacked, the New York Times reported. Stevens is believed to have died of smoke inhalation while locked in a safe room during the attack on the consulate.

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The crowd can be heard questioning whether Stevens was alive before someone shouted that he was still breathing. He is then rushed to a car and driven away.

Protestors had crowded the lightly guarded facility in outrage over an Internet clip produced by an American that ridicules the Muslim Prophet Muhammad.

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The Libyan president in interviews Sunday told American media he believes al Qaida sympathizers may have played a role in coordinating the attack, which took place on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The new evidence of Stevens' final moments comes as protests continue to grow in other parts of the Arab world. In Lebanon, a Hezbollah leader joined a large protest threatening further violence if the full version of the video, a clip of which was posted to YouTube, is published.

"If 12 minutes of the film can [create such a reaction as this], what would be the result if the full version was out," an emotional Sayyed Hasan Nasrallah told the crowd in Beirut, a newspaper there, The Daily Star, reported.

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Protestors chanted, "Death to Israel," "Death to America" and "America, America you are the great Satan," the newspaper said.

Nasrallah also told the crowd he believes the American government was behind production of the film.

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