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Taiwan man arrested over roasted human fetuses

A San Diego Zoo veterinarian points to the spinal column of a giant panda fetus Ton an ultrasound screen at the San Diego Zoo on July 28, 2005. After seeing two fetuses through ultrasound imaging Zoo officials confirmed the Zoo's giant panda adult female, Bai Yun is pregnant. Two heartbeats were detected July 18, however, the research staff wanted to see the two fetuses before announcing a pregnancy. The viability of the second fetus is in question because its development is not equal to the first fetus. (UPI Photo/Ken Bohn/San Diego Zoo)
A San Diego Zoo veterinarian points to the spinal column of a giant panda fetus Ton an ultrasound screen at the San Diego Zoo on July 28, 2005. After seeing two fetuses through ultrasound imaging Zoo officials confirmed the Zoo's giant panda adult female, Bai Yun is pregnant. Two heartbeats were detected July 18, however, the research staff wanted to see the two fetuses before announcing a pregnancy. The viability of the second fetus is in question because its development is not equal to the first fetus. (UPI Photo/Ken Bohn/San Diego Zoo) | License Photo

BANGKOK, May 18 (UPI) -- Police say a man caught in Bangkok with six fetuses that had been roasted and covered in gold leaf said he intended to sell them for use in Thai rituals.

Police said Taiwan native Chow Hok Kuen, 28, was arrested after police found the fetuses -- from 2- to 8-months-old -- in a suitcase in a hotel room in the Yaorawat area, Bangkok's Chinatown, the Bangkok Post reported.

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The man had bought the fetuses several days ago from a Taiwanese man in Thailand for $6,500 and planned to sell them on Taiwanese Web sites for up to six times that amount, police said. The Post said the origin of the fetuses remained unclear.

"He said he planned to sell the fetuses to clients who believe they would make them lucky and rich," said Bangkok police Col. Wiwat Kamchamnan.

In Thai black magic rituals, the Post said, preserved fetuses are believed to bring good fortune to their owners and are often kept in shrines at homes or businesses.

Kuen could face up to a year in jail and a fine of up to about $64.

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