Largest-ever collection of Egyptian art on display in U.S. comes to St. Louis (6 images)

More than 200 artifacts will be on display through Sept. 9 at the Saint Louis Art Museum. Archaeologists found the objects in the submerged ancient cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus. Photos by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
Updated: March 23, 2018 at 12:34 PM
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Franck Goddio, a pioneer of modern maritime archaeology, points out features on a stone Sphinx made between 360-343 B.C. and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Thonis-Heracleion, on display at the Saint Louis Art Museum in St. Louis on March 22, 2018. In 1992, Goddio discovered the ancient Great Port of Alexandria and in 2000, a team comprised of archaeologists, Egyptologists, historians, geologists, geophysicists and computer engineers discovered the submerged ancient city of Thonis-Heracleion and parts of the city of Canopus under 30 feet of water and four miles off today's Egyptian coast. The largest collection of Egyptian art ever shown outside of Egypt, nearly 250 pieces, will be on display until Sept. 9.
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A statue of Arsinoe II made between 300-200 BC and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Canopus sits on display at the Saint Louis Art Museum in St. Louis.
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A Votive Box, made between 664-120 BC and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Thonis-Heracleion sits on display.
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A bust of Neilos, the Greek God of the Nile, made 100-200 BC and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Canopus sits on display.
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A tank basin made between 332-120 BC and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Thonis-Heracleion sits on display.
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A slate of Thonis-Heracleion made about 380 BC and recovered from the lost Mediterranean port city of Thonis-Heracleion sits on display.spaly until September 9, 2018. Photo by Bill Greenblatt/UPI
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