Advertisement

Golf champion Grayson Murray dies at 30

By Ehren Wynder
Grayson Murray, seen here with fiancee Christiana walking to the first hole of the Masters Par 3 Contest in Augusta, Ga., in April, died Saturday morning after withdrawing from the Charles Schwab Challenge due to an illness Friday. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI
1 of 2 | Grayson Murray, seen here with fiancee Christiana walking to the first hole of the Masters Par 3 Contest in Augusta, Ga., in April, died Saturday morning after withdrawing from the Charles Schwab Challenge due to an illness Friday. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

May 25 (UPI) -- Professional golfer and two-time PGA Tour winner Grayson Murray died Saturday, the tour confirmed. He was 30.

Murray's death comes after he withdrew due to an illness late in the second round of the 2024 Charles Schwab Challenge at the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, Friday.

Advertisement

"We were devastated to learn -- and are heartbroken to share -- that PGA Tour player Grayson Murray passed away this morning. I am at a loss for words," PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said in a statement.

"The PGA Tour is a family, and when you lose a member of your family, you are never the same, Monahan said. "We mourn Grayson and pray for comfort for his loved ones."

Monahan said he offered condolences to Murray's parents and that the tournament will continue at their request.

"They were adamant that Grayson would want us to do so," he said. "As difficult as it will be, we want to respect their wishes."

Murray was the second-youngest golfer in history to make the cut on the Korn Ferry Tour before going pro in 2015.

Murray would become a controversial figure marked by frequent outbursts on the field during his career, but his determination won him the PGA Tour twice, with the 2017 Barbasol Championship and 2024 Sony Open, as well as three victories on the Korn Ferry Tour.

Advertisement

He won the Sony Open earlier this year, ending a six-year losing streak during which he struggled mentally and physically.

Murray in interviews had been open about his struggles with anxiety, depression and alcoholism. He said he sought treatment in January but had been sober since 2023.

After he won the Sony Open, he admitted to drinking excessively during tournament weeks.

"It was my outlet. I thought I was invincible coming out here as a 22-year-old, winning as a rookie, played three days hungover when I won," he said. "Best thing and worst thing that ever happened to me was winning my rookie year -- but also feeling like I was invincible."

A native of Raleigh, N.C., Murray attended Wake Forest, East Carolina and Arizona State universities, where he played golf before going pro. He had 10 Top-10 finishes in 141 PGA Tour starts throughout his career.

Notable Deaths

Latest Headlines