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Former D.C. police intelligence supervisor charged over Proud Boys links

An ex-supervisor in the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia's intelligence unit was indicted this week for alerting Enrique Tarrio (pictured), the leader of the far-right Proud Boys group of a warrant for his arrest ahead of the Jan. 6, 2021 U.S. Capitol insurrection. File Photo by Gamal Diab/EPA-EFE
1 of 4 | An ex-supervisor in the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia's intelligence unit was indicted this week for alerting Enrique Tarrio (pictured), the leader of the far-right Proud Boys group of a warrant for his arrest ahead of the Jan. 6, 2021 U.S. Capitol insurrection. File Photo by Gamal Diab/EPA-EFE

May 19 (UPI) -- An ex-supervisor in the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia's intelligence unit was indicted this week for alerting suspects of arrest warrants prior to the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol insurrection.

Former MPD lieutenant Shane Lamond faces one count of obstruction of justice and three counts of making false statements, court documents show.

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The 47-year-old is expected to be arraigned Friday.

The U.S. Attorney's Office accuses Lamond of notifying Enrique Tarrio, the leader of the militant far-right group Proud Boys of an arrest warrant ahead of the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Tarrio was being investigated for obstructing an investigation into the December 2020 destruction of a Black Lives Matter banner and making false statements to federal agents. He was later arrested and pleaded guilty.

The indictment also says Lamond at the time warned Tarrio the charges could be upgraded to a hate crime.

Tarrio was also indicted last year on seditious conspiracy charges related to Jan. 6. He and three associates were convicted earlier this month.

Prosecutors contend Lamond and Tarrio were in frequent contact from July 2019 until January 2021. Lamond worked as a supervisor in the intelligence branch of the MPD Homeland Security Bureau during that time.

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They two allegedly discussed movements and planned activities of the Proud Boys, including those related to Jan. 6, giving the group "sensitive" law enforcement information.

The pair used the encrypted cloud-based messaging service Telegram to communicate, according to the indictment.

"Of course I can't say it officially, but personally I support you all and don't want to see your group's name or reputation dragged through the mud," Lamond said in one Telegram message, according to the 17-page indictment.

If convicted, Lamond faces a maximum 30-year prison sentence for the obstruction of justice charge, and up to five years for each count of making false statements.

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