Advertisement

New polling shows Americans dissatisfied with state of the nation

President Joe Biden (C) is set to deliver his State of the Union address on Tuesday. Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI
President Joe Biden (C) is set to deliver his State of the Union address on Tuesday. Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI | License Photo

Feb. 2 (UPI) -- Americans remain dissatisfied with broad aspects of U.S. society, continuing a trend that began at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, new polling from Gallup indicates.

Just 41% of Americans said that they were satisfied with broad aspects of U.S. society. That number has remained virtually the same over the last three years. It was at 50% right before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advertisement

Quality of life and opportunity to get ahead were the only two societal dimensions that Americans viewed positively. However, those ratings have also dropped off since record highs in 2001 and 2002.

"Less than two-thirds are satisfied with the quality of life today or with the opportunity to get ahead through hard work, down from much higher levels as recently as January 2020," Gallup said.

Just 20% said that they were satisfied with the nation's moral and ethical climate; 24% percent were satisfied with the income and wealth distribution; and only 27% found the size and influence of major corporations acceptable.

On some issues, Republicans and Democrats were in agreement. Nearly the same percentage of members of each party were satisfied with the influence of corporations, and a majority of both respondents from both parties said that they were satisfied with the quality of life.

Advertisement

"Satisfaction ratings with government power, corporate power and income inequality are all at or near their record lows," Gallup said.

Still, many other areas saw wide gaps, with 56% of Republicans saying they were satisfied with the country's gun laws, while just 12% of Democrats felt the same. Republicans were also broadly satisfied with the quality of the environment, and the positions of racial minorities and women.

Democrats were mostly satisfied with the nation's military and security from terrorism.

The new findings come as President Joe Biden is set to deliver his State of the Union address to Congress on Tuesday.

Presidential State of the Union address through the years

President Joe Biden delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in Washington on February 7, 2023. Biden touted his economic achievements over the past two years. Photo by Pat Benic/UPI | License Photo

Latest Headlines