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Solicitor General motion urges Supreme Court to release Trump tax records

Solicitor General General Elizabeth Prelogar Thursday filed a Supreme Court motion on behalf of the Justice Department, House Ways and Means Committee, Treasury Department and IRS asking the court to reject former President Donald Trump's request to block release of his tax records. Photo courtesy of Solicitor general's office.
Solicitor General General Elizabeth Prelogar Thursday filed a Supreme Court motion on behalf of the Justice Department, House Ways and Means Committee, Treasury Department and IRS asking the court to reject former President Donald Trump's request to block release of his tax records. Photo courtesy of Solicitor general's office.

Nov. 10 (UPI) -- The U.S. solicitor general filed a motion Thursday urging the Supreme Court to reject former President Donald Trump's attempt to block the government from getting his tax records.

The motion was filed by Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar on behalf of the Justice Department, House Ways and Means Committee, Treasury Department and the IRS.

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The motion said the court of appeals correctly decided that the tax records request "serves a valid legislative purpose, and the court correctly determined that the request does not threaten the separation of powers."

Prelogar said in the motion, "the request was not overly broad; the request offered detailed and specific evidence that the requested tax information would further its purpose; and the request would not unduly burden the former President, the incumbent, or the institution of the Presidency."

A federal appeals court in August ordered the IRS to release Trump's tax records to the House Ways and Means Committee.

Trump appealed, but in October the full federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. rejected Trump's efforts to block Congress form getting his tax records. So he went to the Supreme Court in a last effort to block congressional access to the tax records.

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Prelogar's motion asserted that Congress is not imposing undue burdens in its tax records request, arguing that the appeals court was right in deciding that issue.

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