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Boeing avoids labor strike at 3 plants; union members to vote on contract

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The postponed walkout came just days after Boeing reported $16.7 billion in revenues during the second quarter, which is down 2% from the same quarter in 2021. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/fb065d9761017d0d16b1b5d319d5fdf8/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
The postponed walkout came just days after Boeing reported $16.7 billion in revenues during the second quarter, which is down 2% from the same quarter in 2021. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Aug. 1 (UPI) -- One of the largest industrial trade unions in the country postponed a planned labor strike on Monday to allow more time for members to vote on a revised contract offer from Boeing.

The strike was planned to begin on Monday and would have seen a walkout by about 2,500 workers represented by the the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers District 837.

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The employees work at three different Boeing locations in St. Louis, St. Charles, Mo., and Mascoutah, Ill.

Negotiations between union leadership and the aviation company over the weekend led to the decision to postpone the strike.

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Next, union members will vote on Boeing's contract offer on Wednesday. The present labor agreement expires Thursday.

"Members will receive information on the modified offer soon," the union said in a statement on its website.

File Photo by Brian Kersey/UPI

The affected workers build weapons and military aircraft at the St. Louis-area plants -- including the F-15 Eagle, F/A-18 Hornet, T-7A trainer and MQ-25.

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The postponed walkout came just days after Boeing reported $16.7 billion in revenues during the second quarter, which is down 2% from the same quarter in 2021.

Boeing President and CEO Dave Calhoun pointed to the company's positive cash flow and deliveries of new airplanes as signs that the company is bouncing back from its troubles associated with the 737 Max and the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Throughout our history, we have seen moments of triumph and moments of challenge," Calhoun said in a statement last week. "Through it all, our people have made the difference, and that could not ring truer today."

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