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Earthquake near U.S.-Mexico border shakes San Diego area

A star marks the epicenter of the earthquake that was recorded in San Diego County on Wednesday night. Image courtesy U.S. Geological Survey
A star marks the epicenter of the earthquake that was recorded in San Diego County on Wednesday night. Image courtesy U.S. Geological Survey

July 7 (UPI) -- An earthquake was felt in far Southern California late on Wednesday, a region where seismic activity is commonplace.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the 3.4-magnitude quake shook San Diego County near the U.S.-Mexico border.

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The quake struck about 6 miles northeast of Ocotillo Wells, Calif., at a depth of nearly 6 miles, the USGS said.

Wednesday's earthquake followed a faint quake that was recorded farther north near San Clemente on Monday.

Southern California is famous for its earthquakes and the San Andreas fault is one of the best-known fault lines in the United States. There are also several other faults that cross the state.

"The earthquakes of California are caused by the movement of huge blocks of the earth's crust -- the Pacific and North American plates," the Southern California Earthquake Center said in a statement.

"The Pacific plate is moving northwest, scraping horizontally past North America at a rate of about [2 inches] per year. About two-thirds of this movement occurs on the San Andreas fault and some parallel faults, including the San Jacinto, Elsinore, and Imperial faults."

No injuries or major damage were reported following Wednesday's quake.

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