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N.Y. lawmakers change concealed carry gun law in wake of Supreme Court ruling

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed into law on Friday new requirements for concealed carry gun permits in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling last week. Photo by Darren McGee/Office of Gov. Kathy Hochul
New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed into law on Friday new requirements for concealed carry gun permits in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling last week. Photo by Darren McGee/Office of Gov. Kathy Hochul

July 2 (UPI) -- New York gun lawmakers have changed the state's concealed carry gun law after a two-day special decision in the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling last week that its law was too strict.

The high court voted 6-3 on June 23 to strike down a New York law that required individuals to prove "proper cause" to obtain an unrestricted license to carry a concealed firearm outside the home, finding that the requirement was too prohibitive in violation of the Second Amendment.

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New York state lawmakers convened a special session on Thursday to rewrite the state law, and on Friday evening they voted 43-20 to pass the legislation.

Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the legislation into law, which is set to take effect Sept. 1, and an appeals board will be created for applicants whose license or renewal is denied or revoked, which will take effect in April.

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"A week ago, the Supreme Court issued a reckless decision removing century-old limitations on who is allowed to carry concealed weapons in our state -- senselessly sending us backward and putting the safety of our resident in jeopardy," Hochul said in a statement after signing the new law Friday. "Today, we are taking swift and bold action to protect New Yorkers."

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Instead of having "proper cause," the new law requires applicants for an unrestricted license to carry a concealed firearm to display "good moral character," which bans people with a felony conviction or subject to outstanding warrant, or dishonorably discharged from the military, illegally using drugs, or otherwise considered a danger to themselves or others.

The law also included new restrictions such as passing a firearm safety course and test, and a review of the last three years of data from their social media accounts to assess character.

It also said that "criminal possession of a firearm," is possession of it in a "sensitive location." Among these locations, was "any place owned or under the control of federal, state or local government, for the purpose of government administration, including courts," along with places of worship, private schools, and locations providing health services.

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