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California law to require all packaging be recyclable or compostable

Mixed recycling for plastic and aluminum and compost for food and food related items containers are seen at the SoFi Stadium prior to the LVI Super Bowl game in Inglewood, Calif., on February 12. On Thursday, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law requiring all packaging to be recyclable or compostable. File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/911d0aad918d0cc8241708e8274f6bcc/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
Mixed recycling for plastic and aluminum and compost for food and food related items containers are seen at the SoFi Stadium prior to the LVI Super Bowl game in Inglewood, Calif., on February 12. On Thursday, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a law requiring all packaging to be recyclable or compostable. File Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | License Photo

July 1 (UPI) -- California Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed legislation requiring all packaging to be recyclable or compostable and for packaging makers to pay for the cost of recycling plastic waste.

Under the new law, called Senate Bill 54, 30% of all plastic packaging must be recycled by Jan. 1, 2028, 40% by Jan. 1, 2030, and at least 65% by Jan. 1, 2032. All packaging must be either recyclable or compostable by 2032 and plastic packaging must be reduced by 25% in 10 years.

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"Our kids deserve a future free of plastic waste and all its dangerous impacts, everything from clogging our oceans to killing animals -- contaminating the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat," Newsom said. "No more. California won't tolerate plastic waste that's filling our waterways and making it harder to breathe. We're holding polluters responsible and cutting plastics at the source."

The legislation seeks to raise $5 billion from the plastics industry over 10 years to shift "the plastic pollution burden from consumers" to set up the infrastructure to recycle plastics, particularly in disadvantaged communities.

"As someone who grew up and represents the San Fernando Valley, I see firsthand how disadvantaged and low-income communities bear the brunt of plastic pollution," said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas, a Democrat. "With the amendments that were proposed by my Assembly Natural Resources Committee, we now have one of the strongest plastics reduction laws in the nation. I feel proud to have jointly authored SB 54."

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