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Biden signs declaration addressing migration on final day of summit

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris attend the plenary at the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, on Thursday. Biden is expected to sign a declaration addressing migration on Friday. Photo by David Swanson/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/662754b75adb5afcf1d92a7029ced039/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris attend the plenary at the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, on Thursday. Biden is expected to sign a declaration addressing migration on Friday. Photo by David Swanson/UPI | License Photo

June 10 (UPI) -- President Joe Biden signed a declaration with other Latin American countries Friday on the last day of the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles in an effort to address the continent's migration crisis, despite the absence of Mexico.

"With this declaration, we're transforming the approach to managing migration in the Americas," Biden said during the summit.

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"It's going to take all of our nations working together in partnership to address this migration issue."

The Los Angeles Declaration of Migration, signed by 20 countries, provides economic support for countries most impacted by refugees and migration and sets a framework for a coordinated approach to managing migration.

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"We know that safe, orderly, legal migration is good for all our economies. We need to halt the dangerous and unlawful ways people are migrating, the dangerous ways," Biden said.

The plan places a major emphasis on providing labor opportunities in the United States and other countries, allowing for migrants to pursue work within South America and Central America.

Some countries such as Belize will implement programs to regularize migrants who have been living in the country illegally while others like Ecuador will be creating new migration paths for those from Venezuala who entered legally but are now out of status.

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Canada will be welcoming up to 4,000 refugees from the region by 2029 as well as more than 50,000 agricultural workers from Mexico, Guatemala and the Caribbean through this year, according to a White House fact sheet.

Canada will also be investing around $26.9 million in the "socio-economic and labor market integration of refugees and migrants."

Mexico plans to integrate 20,000 recognized refugees into the Mexican labor market over the next three years.

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The country will also launch a new temporary labor program to provide work opportunities in Mexico for up to 20,000 workers from Guatemala.

The United States will announce $314 million in new aid to fund stabilization efforts in the western hemisphere as well as a multilateral "sting operation" to disrupt human smuggling networks in the Western Hemisphere.

The White House said it will also develop a pilot program through the U.S. Department of Agriculture to similarly allow farmers to hire agriculture workers, funded through the American Rescue Plan.

"I think you will be pleased to see a long list of deliverables from the countries that adopt the declaration," a White House official said before the declaration was signed.

"You know, this is really important to the president that this not be a statement of principles -- that countries come forward with something to put on the table, just as we will be doing."

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Vice President Kamala Harris speaks as she attends the Capital Pride Festival on Pennsylvania Avenue on Sunday. Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI | License Photo

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