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Kellogg's workers ratify agreement, ending 11-week strike

The Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers international union workers approved a new five-year contract Tuesday with Kellogg's, whose workers have been on strike for 11 weeks. File Photo by Monika Graff/UPI | <a href="/News_Photos/lp/858628f99933a774df55fb370ec35f21/" target="_blank">License Photo</a>
The Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers international union workers approved a new five-year contract Tuesday with Kellogg's, whose workers have been on strike for 11 weeks. File Photo by Monika Graff/UPI | License Photo

Dec. 21 (UPI) -- Kellogg's workers ratified a deal Tuesday that ends an 11-week strike.

The Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers international union workers approved a new five-year contract.

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Some 1,400 workers were striking plants in Battle Creek, Mich., Omaha, Neb., Lancaster, Pa. and Memphis, mostly over pay and benefits.

Union President Anthony Shelton said in a statement after the deal was ratified, "From picket line to picket line, Kellogg's union members stood strong and undeterred in this fight, inspiring generations of workers across the globe, who were energized by their tremendous show of bravery as they stood up to fight and never once backed down."

Kellogg's confirmed the workers had ratified the agreement ending the strike and welcomed them back to work.

"We are pleased that we have reached an agreement that brings our cereal employees back to work," Steve Cahillane, company chairman and CEO, said in a statement. "We look forward to their return and continuing to produce our beloved cereal brands for our customers and consumers."

The union said the deal included no concessions to the company, a plant closing moratorium through October 2026, a significant increase in the pension multiplier and maintenance of cost-of-living raises.

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Workers went on strike mainly to protest company efforts to use a two-tier pay system that paid new hires $30,000 to $40,000 less per year than legacy workers and charge them $300 a month more for healthcare.

They were also protesting over pensions, forced overtime and plans to outsource jobs.

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