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Rare fall nor'easter, 'miserable' weather to mark final week of October

By Nicole LoBiondo, Accuweather.com
Rare fall nor'easter, 'miserable' weather to mark final week of October
The sun sets behind One World Trade Center and the Manhattan skyline in New York City on Friday. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Many in the northeastern United States have rarely had to bring out rain coats and jackets due to the lack of chilly temperatures and relatively dry conditions so far this October, but a change in the weather pattern will throw a wrench into the unseasonable warmth this week ahead of Halloween.

Remember Memorial Day weekend? It was rainy, unseasonably cold and positively miserable from Philadelphia up through New York City and Boston -- and probably the last time folks in these metro areas have felt that combo of raw, rainy conditions. Forecasters say the days leading up to Halloween could feel a lot like that in the Northeast. Two nor'easters could take aim at the region this week, which is unusual for this time of the year, according to AccuWeather Director of Forecasting Dan DePodwin. One could start the week and then another could arrive toward the end of the week.
While there will be a brief rebound in rising temperatures across some parts of the Northeast ahead of the next storm, chilly air will accompany the arrival of a series of storms this upcoming week. After originating over the Pacific Ocean and slamming into the West Coast with potentially devastating consequences this weekend through early week, the storms will move west-to-east across the country. They will continue to unleash drenching rain and severe thunderstorms that will target millions across the central and eastern United States before moving into the Northeast.

While severe thunderstorms will be confined in the Ohio and Tennessee River valleys, rain and showers will spread farther north ahead of the potent storm Monday and Monday night. By Tuesday, the storm will strengthen as it moves off the southern New England coast, bombarding residents with heavy rain and increasingly windy conditions.

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"An early season tempest could bring a wind-driven, chilly rain to portions of the Northeast from Monday through Wednesday," AccuWeather meteorologist Randy Adkins said, adding that flooding could be a significant concern across southern New England.

The nor'easter, which is simply any large storm that brings northeasterly winds along the Atlantic coast of North America, according to the National Weather Service definition, is expected to move up the New England coastline Monday night through Wednesday. Flooding downpours will set up from southern Maine to eastern New York in cities such as Boston and Worcester, Massachusetts, which are expected to pick up 4 inches to the AccuWeather Local Stormmax&trade of 8 inches as the storm intensifies off the coast.

"Heavy rain, gusty winds and coastal flooding can occur Monday into Tuesday across New England," DePodwin said, noting it could be an early season nor'easter.

Defining features of a nor'easter can include howling winds that could be damaging at times. There will be no exception with this storm as winds are expected to gust from 40 to 60 mph from the Jersey Shore Tuesday to the southern shore of Nova Scotia in Atlantic Canada by Wednesday with the most intense winds confined to Cape Code extending north to coastal New Hampshire. Cities such as Provincetown, Plymouth and Boston, Massachusetts, could experience wind gusts from 60 to the AccuWeather Local StormMax&trade of 80 mph Tuesday night.

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As the storm intensifies off the New England coast Tuesday and Wednesday, blustery onshore winds reaching nearly 80 mph in spots will bring the possibility for coastal flooding, beach erosion and power outages. With a late start to the fall-foliage season underway across southern New England, many trees still have plenty of leaves on them, making the possibility for downed trees due to strong winds a possibility too.

Blustery conditions that will accompany this storm, along with the combination of clouds and rain will produce AccuWeather RealFeel® Temperatures 5-10 degrees lower than the actual temperature Monday and Tuesday. This cooler change from the unseasonably warm conditions felt last week across much of the Northeast may be enough to result in some shock value for residents where temperatures have averaged 5-10 degrees Fahrenheit above normal during the first 21 days of October.

On top of that, AccuWeather meteorologists say the developing weather pattern will have staying power. But will the miserable weather stick around and throw a wrench in the plans of trick or treaters? More on that below.

By Thursday, the nor'easter will move away from the eastern United States and much of the Northeast will be able to dry out, while another storm is expected to approach the region from the west.

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"The same massive storm that is currently bringing heavy rain, snow and strong winds to the Western states is expected to slowly move eastward across the country this week," AccuWeather Senior meteorologist Brett Anderson explained.

Unfortunately, it appears that this storm may bring another round of significant rain and strong coastal winds to the northeast just in time for the Halloween weekend, potentially throwing a wrench in the plans of trick or treaters Sunday night for residents in the Northeast.

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