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Apple appeals judicial order allowing developers to potentially evade fees

Apple appeals judicial order allowing developers to potentially evade fees
Apple filed an appeal Friday over an injunction preventing the tech giant from enforcing guideline to prohibit in-app links that could potentially be used to evade its fees. File Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI | License Photo

Oct. 9 (UPI) -- Apple has appealed a judicial ruling in a court battle with Epic Games that allows developers to add in-app links to potentially evade its App Store fees.

Along with the notice of appeal in federal court in California, the tech giant also filed a motion Friday for a stay on the injunction pending the resolution of the appeal.

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A judge will decide on the stay in November, but appeals could take years, CNBC reported.

Apple has charged developers as much as 30% to use its App Store, resulting in complaints from opponents who say the fees are unfair and anti-competitive.

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The legal fight stems from Apple pulling the Fortnite video game from its App Store last year after Epic found an in-house payment option to bypass Apple's App Store payment system.

Apple said Epic violated its app store policy.

Last month, U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers ruled that Apple didn't violate antitrust law by charging the 30% commission, and ordered Epic Games to pay at least $3.6 million to Apple for revenue collected from Fortnite users through its platform.

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However, Rogers also ruled that Apple violated California competition laws by hiding information from consumers and impeding their choice.

The September ruling also included a nationwide injunction that stops Apple from enforcing a guideline that prohibits developers from putting into their apps "metadata buttons, external links, or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms."

Apple argued in the motion for a stay that having to revise this guideline due to the injunction, which is slated to go into effect Dec. 9, "would irreparably harm both Apple and consumers."

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"The requested stay will allow Apple to protect consumers and safeguard its platform while the company works through the complex and rapidly evolving legal, technological, and economic issues that any revisions to this guideline would implicate," the motion stated.

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