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12 hospitalized in multi-state salmonella outbreak linked to Italian meats

12 hospitalized in multi-state salmonella outbreak linked to Italian meats
The Centers of Disease and Prevention on Wednesday said 12 people have been hospitalized due to two strands of salmonella in 17 states linked to Italian meats found in antipasto or charcuterie assortments. Photo by FrankGeorg/Pixabay

Aug. 25 (UPI) -- A dozen people have been hospitalized due to outbreaks of two strands of salmonella throughout multiple states, the U.S. Centers of Disease and Prevention said Wednesday.

The CDC said 36 people had fallen ill in 17 states after eating salami, prosciutto and other Italian-style meats that are found in antipasto or charcuterie assortments.

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"Until we identify which Italian-style meats are making people sick, heat all Italian-style meats to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit until steaming hot before eating if you are at higher risk," the CDC said.

People younger than 5 or older than 65 who have a chronic health or immune-compromising conditions, or take any medications that lower their immunity and body's ability to fight germs are considered at higher risk for salmonella sickness.

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The CDC reported that 23 people in 14 states were infected with a strain of salmonella called Typhimurium between the end of May and July 27.

Nine people have been hospitalized but no deaths have been reported. Laboratory testing found that 20 of the cases were resistant to antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline.

Outbreaks have been reported in Arizona, California, Nevada, Washington, Utah, Colorado, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Virginia Maryland and Indiana.

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Between early May and the end of June, another 13 people were infected with a strain called Salmonella Infantis, typically affecting children younger than 2.

The strain has sickened people between the ages of 1 to 74 and three have been hospitalized.

No deaths have been recorded and laboratory testing did not find antibiotic resistance.

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Infections were reported in Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Texas, Minnesota, and New York.

Symptoms of salmonella include diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever and usually emerge within 12 hours to 72 hours of consuming contaminated food and last between four and seven days.

Most people recover without treatment though some may experience severe illness requiring medical treatment or hospitalization.

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