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Alaska shaken by 8.2-magnitude earthquake; strongest since 1960s

By
Kyle Barnett
A tsunami warning was issued for coastal areas of southern Alaska, the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, but was canceled after about an hour. Image courtesy U.S. Geological Survey
A tsunami warning was issued for coastal areas of southern Alaska, the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, but was canceled after about an hour. Image courtesy U.S. Geological Survey

July 29 (UPI) -- An 8.2.-magnitude earthquake struck off of Alaska's Aleutian Islands late on Wednesday and triggered a tsunami warning, officials said.

The earthquake stuck at a depth of nearly 30 miles and was located about 50 miles from the nearest settlement, Perryville, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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"This is the largest earthquake to happen in the Alaska region since 1965," Michael West, seismologist with the Alaska Earthquake Center, told Alaska Public Media.

The tsunami warning, which was issued for coastal areas of southern Alaska, the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, was eventually canceled after about an hour.

There were at least two strong aftershocks with preliminary magnitudes of 6.2 and magnitude 5.6, the USGS said.

There were no reports of injuries or property damage.

"The good news is this does not look like a really significant event," Dave Snider, a tsunami warning coordinator with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said, according to Alaska Public Media.

In Kodiak, Alaska, video captured the sounds of tsunami sirens. One-foot waves were seen in the town of Palmer following the tsunami warning.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center canceled tsunami warnings in Hawaii and Guam when it became clear the earthquake did not produce destructive waves.

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