Advertisement

Walter Reed doctor who criticized Trump motorcade greeting works final shift

Dr. James Phillips worked his final shift at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after criticizing President Donald Trump's decision to greet supporters from his motorcade while being treated for COVID-19. File Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI
Dr. James Phillips worked his final shift at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after criticizing President Donald Trump's decision to greet supporters from his motorcade while being treated for COVID-19. File Photo by Oliver Contreras/UPI | License Photo

Dec. 28 (UPI) -- An emergency room doctor at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center worked his last day at the hospital after criticizing President Donald Trump's decision to greet supporters from his motorcade while he was being treated for COVID-19.

Dr. James Phillips announced on Twitter on Sunday that he had worked his final shift as he was removed from the work schedule after describing the motorcade greeting during Trump's brief stay at the hospital as "completely unnecessary."

Advertisement

"I will miss the patients and my military and civilian coworkers -- they have been overwhelmingly supportive. I'm honored to have worked there and I look forward to new opportunities," he wrote. "I stand by my words, and I regret nothing."

Walter Reed told CNN Monday that there was "no decision by anyone" at the hospital to remove Phillips from the work schedule.

RELATED New COVID-19 cases, deaths in U.S. fall to lowest levels in weeks

"As you may know, Dr. Phillps worked as a contract employee at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, which provides requirements for contract employees to the contract agency," the hospital said.

"The contract agency then works together with contract employees to determine individual schedules."

Advertisement

Two days after being admitted to Walter Reed upon testing positive for COVID-19, Trump made what he described as a "surprise" visit to supporters in the motorcade, wearing a cloth mask while sitting in the back seat of the vehicle as he waved at those who gathered outside of the hospital.

RELATED Trump to speak at Georgia GOP rally ahead of state runoff

Secret Service agents riding in the car wore N95 masks, protective eyewear and protective gowns, the White House said at the time.

Following the incident, Phillips tweeted that Trump had put lives at risk for "political theater" and that everyone inside the vehicle should have quarantined for 14 days following.

"That Presidential SUV is not only bulletproof, but hermetically sealed against chemical attack," he wrote in the since-deleted tweet. "The risk of COVID-19 transmission inside is as high as it gets outside of medical procedures. The irresponsibility is astounding. My thoughts are with the Secret Service forced to play."

RELATED Presidential transition, weak funding put 2024 moon landing goal in doubt

Phillips will continue his work at George Washington University, where he serves as chief of disaster medicine.

Latest Headlines