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Louisville courthouse closes ahead of decision in Breonna Taylor case

By
Don Jacobson
A mural depicting Breonna Taylor and George Floyd is seen in Vernon, Calif., on September 11. Taylor was shot dead during a police raid in March.  Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI
A mural depicting Breonna Taylor and George Floyd is seen in Vernon, Calif., on September 11. Taylor was shot dead during a police raid in March.  Photo by Jim Ruymen/UPI | License Photo

Sept. 21 (UPI) -- The federal courthouse in Louisville, Ky., began a week-long closure Monday as officials prepared for a decision this week on possible charges against three police officers in the killing of Breonna Taylor.

The Gene Snyder U.S. Courthouse in downtown Louisville will be closed through Friday under an order signed last week by Chief Judge Greg Stivers of the District Court for Western Kentucky.

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Stivers said the closure was requested by the General Services Administration, which manages the courthouse. All matters scheduled for in-court appearances will either be continued or conducted via video conference, the order stated.

Officials expect the decision could be met with civil unrest.

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A spokesman for Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Friday the city hasn't yet been notified when Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron could make a decision whether to press charges.

Louisville Police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, officer Myles Cosgrove and former officer Brett Hankison face charges in Taylor's death in March. Taylor, 26, was shot in her apartment during a "no-knock" search warrant related to a narcotics investigation.

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Cameron has declined to discuss a timeline on a decision or say whether the case will be presented to a grand jury.

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Taylor's death, and that of of George Floyd in Minnesota, spurred weeks of unrest and calls for the Louisville officers to be prosecuted.

Hankison, who fired bullets into Taylor's apartment during the raid, was dismissed from the force in June. Activists have called for all three officers to face charges.

The city of Louisville agreed last week to a $12 million civil settlement with Taylor's family.

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Protesters march for social justice

The Surrogate's Court building exterior remains vandalized while Occupy City Hall protests continue outside City Hall in New York City on June 30. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

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