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Judge to decide if Sandy Hook families can delay Remington bankruptcy

By
Don Jacobson
Parents are seen at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on December 14, 2012, following a shooting attack that killed 26 people, mostly young children. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI
Parents are seen at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on December 14, 2012, following a shooting attack that killed 26 people, mostly young children. File Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

Aug. 18 (UPI) -- A federal judge in Alabama on Tuesday is expected to decide if relatives of the victims of the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School attack should be allowed to interrupt the bankruptcy case of firearms maker Remington.

Judge Clifton Jessup Jr. of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court of the Northern District of Alabama is scheduled to hold a hearing in the case, in which the company is asking for fast-track approval to auction off parts of the company as part of its bankruptcy proceedings.

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The Sandy Hook relatives are suing because granting Remington a quick auction would stifle an effort by nine families to be added to the list of creditors.

The hearing was scheduled for 10 a.m. EDT.

RELATED Remington Arms files for bankruptcy

The families argued in a filing in bankruptcy court this month that they will be irreparably harmed if they don't have a say in the proceedings as a major creditor. They hold Remington responsible for the Dec. 14, 2012, shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., in which the gunman used a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle. Twenty young children and six educators died in the attack.

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The families argue that Remington marketed the AR-15 assault-style rifle in a way that inspired gunman Adam Lanza to carry out the plot. Lanza ultimately killed himself at the school.

The U.S. Supreme Court declined last fall to intervene in the case and Remington has argued that it's shielded by a federal law that bars persons from holding firearm manufacturers liable for crimes committed by gun owners.

RELATED Sandy Hook suit against gunmaker Remington set for trial in 2021

Remington, the oldest gunmaker in the United States, filed for bankruptcy last month -- the second time it had done so within 28 months. The families first sued Remington in 2015 and the gunmaker has been fighting to keep it from going to court ever since.

RELATED Sandy Hook ruling may persuade gunmakers to help reduce violence

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