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Flooding, damage, power outages in Texas after Hurricane Hanna

By
Don Jacobson
Flooding is seen in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday after the area was hit by Hurricane Hanna. The storm arrived at Category 1 strength and was the first hurricane to make landfall in the United States in 2020. Photo courtesy City of McAllen, Texas/Facebook
Flooding is seen in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday after the area was hit by Hurricane Hanna. The storm arrived at Category 1 strength and was the first hurricane to make landfall in the United States in 2020. Photo courtesy City of McAllen, Texas/Facebook

July 27 (UPI) -- Tens of thousands of Texas residents remained without power Monday after Hurricane Hanna made landfall over the weekend as a Category 1 storm.

More than 65,000 customers were still without electricity Monday, according to utility American Electric Power. That figure was down, however, from a peak of 200,000 early Sunday.

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Widespread outages were reported in the Rio Grande Valley along the U.S.-Mexico border, and covered cities including Edinburg, McAllen and Harlingen. Additional outages were reported further north along the Texas Gulf Coast and around Corpus Christi.

Severe flooding and high waters in some areas hampered crews trying to restore electricity.

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Aerial video footage has revealed extensive damage and flooding from the storm in some areas. Mercedes, about 20 miles east of McAllen, saw extensive water damage while Corpus Christi saw far less.

Hanna was a Category 1 Hurricane when it made landfall early Saturday on Padre Island, Texas. It later arrived on mainland Texas near Port Mansfield and ultimately weakened to a tropical storm.

The storm crossed into Mexico and caused widespread flooding, officials said. Nearly 250 homes were flooded in Saltillo, Mexico, about 80 miles southwest of Monterrey.

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection was attempting Sunday to verify reports that a section of border wall between the United States and Mexico had been damaged by the storm.

CPB spokesman Roderick Kise said one video that had been posted online did not appear to be authentic.

"The hurricane hit us at nighttime, but looks like it was shot during the day," Kise told the Corpus Christi Caller Times.

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